Chittaurgarh Fort, the ancient Chitrakuta occupies a place of pride in the history of Rajputs as it remained an important seat of Rajput power from the 7th to 16th cent. AD. The construction of fort is ascribed to Chitrangad of the Mori dynasty in 7th century A.D. It has been a witness to the rulers of several dynasties such as the Mori or Mauryas (7-8th century AD), Pratiharas (9-10th century AD), Paramaras (10-11th century AD), Solankis (12th century AD) and lastly by Guhilots or Sisodia clan of Rajputs and was finally abandoned in 1568 after the siege by Emperor Akbar in 1567. It sprawls majestically over a hill 180 m (590.6 ft) in height spread over an area of 280 ha (691.9 acres) above the plains of the valley drained by the Berach River.

Historically, Chittaurgarh is established as an indomitable Rajput hill fort withstanding several attacks by Muslim invaders such as Alauddin Khilji in 1303 AD, Sultan Bahadur Shah of Gujarat in 1535 AD and finally by the Mughal Emperor Akbar in 1567 AD. Each time the Rajput women and children committed the ritual of Jauhar (group immolation by the women and children of a besieged fort when the fall of the place seems inevitable). Hence, the Fort has strong associations with these sacrificial events.

Chittorgarh Fort is truly an embodiment of chivalry and pride of the Rajputs. The fort has a long story of romance, courage, determination and sacrifice. A glimpse of the fort still makes one to think the glory of the Rajputs who once lived here.

Enclosed within defensive walls pierced with several gateways, the fort precinct with an evocative history is studded with major urban centers, well-designed palaces, two commemorative towers, havelis, series of temples, baori and water bodies, etc.

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